In Trout Lake Valley, Skullcap Grows to Meet Demand. - Columbia Land Trust
Scutellaria Lateriflora. Illustration by Millspaugh, C.F.(1854-1923)

Scutellaria Lateriflora. Illustration by Millspaugh, C.F.(1854-1923)

Trout Lake Farm began organically growing medicinal herbs in Trout Lake Valley in 1973. Today it grows everything from echinacea to valerian on 280 acres (depending on what herbs are in demand). These days, the farm makes ample room for skullcap (Scutellaria lateriflora), a herbaceous perennial in the mint family that’s known to reduce inflammation and help with problems like anxiety. “We’ve definitely seen an increase in demand in the past couple of years,” says Trout Lake Farm’s West Farm Manager Danielle Hawkins. Skullcap’s medicinal properties have been known for decades. (Consider the illustration at left, which came from a book about medicinal plants published in 1892.) transported to their onsite milling facility right there in the valley. Once the milling process has been completed, and the product has been reviewed by a quality team, it is released for sale. From there it heads to tea manufacturers, extract and tablet manufacturers, and medicinal herb distributors all over the world. Columbia Land Trust is proud to be a part of Trout Lake Farm’s story. In 2001, we helped Trout Lake Farm place a 55-acre conservation easement on the farmland that guarantees the farm will not be developed. That will keep the land working, the jobs local, and will ensure Trout Lake Valley’s scenic beauty will be conserved forever.

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