Willapa Bay & Long Beach Peninsula

Kayaking Island Lake Forest
  • Number of Projects:9
  • Acreage: 1615
  • Fact: The green sturgeon of Willapa Bay are among the largest cartilaginous fish in the world, reaching seven feet in length and weighing up to 350 pounds.
  • Experience: Beaches, sand dunes, marshes, lakes, and old-growth forests all come together to create a coastal wonderland for wildlife and the people who call this Pacific haven home.
  • What We’re Doing: Conserving and caring for coastal dunes, forests, wetlands, streams, riverfront, and bayfront land. Protecting the drinking water supply by conserving the freshwater wetlands that help groundwater recharge and stay clean.

Contact Us About This Project

The Big Picture

Encompassing more than 260 square miles , Willapa Bay is the second-largest estuary on the Pacific Coast and is very much a Northwest treasure. Columbia Land Trust conserved its first property on Long Beach Peninsula in 2001—a small property around Hines Marsh, a 900-acre wetland often billed as the largest “interdunal wetland” on the West Coast. Conserving lands that protect drinking water, wildlife areas, and rare habitats motivate our work here.

Why It Matters

Thanks to low population density and a lack of industrial development, wildlife still thrives on the Long Beach Peninsula and in Willapa Bay. More than 100,000 shorebirds rest and feed during the spring migration; five salmon species pass through the bay en route to natal rivers on the east side of the bay; green and white sturgeon, those bizarrely prehistoric fish, find refuge in the bay itself. The waters of Willapa Bay are relatively pristine, but pristine doesn’t mean unchanged of course. Invasive species, such as spartina, are a constant threat to area waters. By protecting freshwater wetlands, we’re not only protecting wildlife habitat, but also the peninsula’s drinking water, essential to local economies and human health.

Salmon charging upstream. Photo by Brian Chambers Photography
Featured Story

Traveling Upstream

Executive Director Glenn Lamb checks in on the efforts of the Land Trust's Conservation Agenda, and shares major priorities that lie ahead.

  In 2017 Columbia Land Trust staff prepared a Conservation Agenda for the next 25 years of our work. The two major goals that we zeroed in on: Conserve more land and engage more people. In this effort, we want to ensure nature in the Northwest thrives even as our population grows, and that underrepresented…

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Updates from the Field
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Give More (24!) on 9/20
Join us Thursday, September 20th, as we kick off year 2 of our fearless campaign with a day of giving in Southwest Washington.

  Columbia Land Trust has deep roots in Southwest Washington and Clark County. While today we work in 14 counties on both the Washinton and Oregon sides of the river, we were born from a desire to conserve land in Southwest Washington that was being developed at an alarming rate. Today, we’re experiencing an all-too-familiar sense…

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Fieldbook Digs In
Our final edition of Fieldbook rounds out 2017 with stories from the field.

Cozy up this winter with a fresh copy of our final issue of Fieldbook this year. Learn about important fossil discoveries in the Columbia River Estuary, look at how community groups are embracing the Backyard Habitat Certification Program as a tool for community building, and read about recent conservation successes in Trout Lake and the Long…

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A Boggy Notion
Fifty-five newly conserved acres on Long Beach Peninsula expand an anchor habitat that supports a unique blend of coastal, wetland, and forest ecosystems.

We’re pleased to announce the conservation of 55 acres in the interior of Long Beach Peninsula in Pacific County, Washington. The conserved wetland property builds on 750 acres Columbia Land Trust has conserved along Island Lake and Loomis Lake directly north, in addition to 460 acres of habitat managed by Washington State Parks and the…

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