Clark County

East Fork Lewis River. Photo by Rollin Bannow.
  • Number of Projects:10
  • Acreage: 972
  • Fact: In the 1920s, Clark County was considered the prune capital of the world, which was then the nation’s most popular breakfast fruit. Today Sutter County, California claims the title.
  • Experience: Southwest Washington's population center, Clark County is nonetheless rich in wild splendor. The county includes two wildlife refuges, as well as great Columbia River tributaries such as the East Fork Lewis and Salmon Rivers.
  • What We’re Doing: Columbia Land Trust got its start in Clark County; today we're focusing our conservation work along the East Fork Lewis and Washougal Rivers—some of the best remaining habitat in the area.
Contact Us About This Project

The Big Picture

Columbia Land Trust got its start in Vancouver, and 25 years later we’re still working to conserve the natural places here. Over the years, we’ve developed deep and lasting partnerships with people, communities, and elected leaders. Those relationships helped us play a leading role in conserving places like Camp Curry—a 100-year-old children’s camp on Lacamas Lake that was going to be sold for development. Clark County also boasts places where you can get your toes into the Columbia River: The wide sand beaches of Vancouver’s Frenchman’s Bar Park as well as Washougal’s William Clark Park are two waterfront parks where you can get to the water’s edge.

Why It Matters

For 20-plus years, Clark County was the fastest-growing county in Washington, but natural wonder remains abundant. Places such as Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge and the Lacamas Lake north of Camas are strongholds for wildlife and natural beauty. Salmon Creek, which flows west through Vancouver; and East Fork Lewis River, which flows through Clark County, are two of the most important waterways for Columbia River salmon. With the population slated for continued growth, our challenge is providing for more people while also addressing the needs of native fish, wildlife, and plants.

Lacamas Lake, Washington
Featured Story

Funding a Nature-Rich Future

7-million-dollar bond measure a major win for conservation in Clark County, Washington

It’s hard to imagine Clark County without riverside trails, parks, working forests, farmland, and rushing rivers such as the East Fork Lewis alive with salmon and steelhead. Recent news offers hope that at a time of rapid change, the county is committed to keeping nature at the heart of its growing communities. We at Columbia…

Read More
Updates from the Field
View All
Hail to the Underdog
We’re giving Columbia River chum salmon—aka dog salmon—a fighting chance.

Editor’s note: This article originally ran in our Fall 2014 issue of Fieldbook. We decided to reshare it after members of our staff recently observed chum salmon spawning at our property near the I-205 bridge.  Chum get a bum rap. Read any story about Oncorhynchus keta, and writers tend to note their troubles: They’re nicknamed…

Read More
Give More (24!) This Thursday
Join us this Thursday, September 21st, as we kick off our Fearless Conservation campaign with a day of giving in Southwest Washington

  At Columbia Land Trust, we believe that the land can bring us together, wildlife can teach us, and water can nurture our spirit. As Northwesterners, we find strength in stepping outside our comfort zones. We summit mountains and hike hillsides, try out new adventures from birdwatching to backyard restoration, and take time to simply stop…

Read More
2016 in Review
Ten ways you made a difference for the nature of the northwest in 2016.

It wasn’t always easy (meaningful conservation rarely is), but with your support, we were able to protect and restore important places throughout the Columbia River region while building strong relationships along the way. From the remote forests of Klickitat Canyon to backyard habitats in urban neighborhoods, take a look back at some of our greatest accomplishments…

Read More