Clark County

East Fork Lewis River. Photo by Rollin Bannow.
  • Number of Projects:10
  • Acreage: 972
  • Fact: In the 1920s, Clark County was considered the prune capital of the world, which was then the nation’s most popular breakfast fruit. Today Sutter County, California claims the title.
  • Experience: Southwest Washington's population center, Clark County is nonetheless rich in wild splendor. The county includes two wildlife refuges, as well as great Columbia River tributaries such as the East Fork Lewis and Salmon Rivers.
  • What We’re Doing: Columbia Land Trust got its start in Clark County; today we're focusing our conservation work along the East Fork Lewis and Washougal Rivers—some of the best remaining habitat in the area.
Contact Us About This Project

The Big Picture

Columbia Land Trust got its start in Vancouver, and 25 years later we’re still working to conserve the natural places here. Over the years, we’ve developed deep and lasting partnerships with people, communities, and elected leaders. Those relationships helped us play a leading role in conserving places like Camp Curry—a 100-year-old children’s camp on Lacamas Lake that was going to be sold for development. Clark County also boasts places where you can get your toes into the Columbia River: The wide sand beaches of Vancouver’s Frenchman’s Bar Park as well as Washougal’s William Clark Park are two waterfront parks where you can get to the water’s edge.

Why It Matters

For 20-plus years, Clark County was the fastest-growing county in Washington, but natural wonder remains abundant. Places such as Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge and the Lacamas Lake north of Camas are strongholds for wildlife and natural beauty. Salmon Creek, which flows west through Vancouver; and East Fork Lewis River, which flows through Clark County, are two of the most important waterways for Columbia River salmon. With the population slated for continued growth, our challenge is providing for more people while also addressing the needs of native fish, wildlife, and plants.

Salmon charging upstream. Photo by Brian Chambers Photography
Featured Story

Traveling Upstream

Executive Director Glenn Lamb checks in on the efforts of the Land Trust's Conservation Agenda, and shares major priorities that lie ahead.

  In 2017 Columbia Land Trust staff prepared a Conservation Agenda for the next 25 years of our work. The two major goals that we zeroed in on: Conserve more land and engage more people. In this effort, we want to ensure nature in the Northwest thrives even as our population grows, and that underrepresented…

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Updates from the Field
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Give More (24!) on 9/20
Join us Thursday, September 20th, as we kick off year 2 of our fearless campaign with a day of giving in Southwest Washington.

  Columbia Land Trust has deep roots in Southwest Washington and Clark County. While today we work in 14 counties on both the Washinton and Oregon sides of the river, we were born from a desire to conserve land in Southwest Washington that was being developed at an alarming rate. Today, we’re experiencing an all-too-familiar sense…

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Fieldbook Crawls Out for Spring
Our first edition of our 2018 Fieldbook magazine is now out!

Our newest edition of Fieldbook has all the wildlife and conservation stories you’re looking for this spring. In this issue, we break open some preconceived notions about unloved wildlife from moles to spiders, what it looks like to be an outdoors person, and how climate resilience informs our work. Learn how Jenny Bruso, self-identified fat,…

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Hear the Cranes Come
A farming experiment is benefiting endangered sandhill cranes and could establish new research for crane conservation in the Northwest.

It’s 7 a.m. and ecologist Rob Dillinger sits in his car alongside a cornfield near the Frenchman’s Bar Park in Vancouver, Washington. He’s waiting for something magical to occur. A rattling baritone call heralds the approach of sandhill cranes stretching above the lower Columbia River from Oregon’s Sauvie Island. They come here for the food,…

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